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Title: Sisson Cemetery
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Several cemeteries in Steuben are clustered close together just east of Johnsonville and south of Marshfield. More details on some of these cemeteries can be found in the 1966 History of Warren County, pages 114-117. Two of these cemeteries are on private property and are located near the Norfolk & Western Railroad as it runs between Marshfield and Johnsonville. SISSON CEMETERY Take the blacktop west from Marshfield to the first road to the south. Just before crossing the railroad is private drive to the right. Sisson and Tomlinson cemeteries are both on this property. The Tomlinson can be seen from the drive to the north of the house. The Sisson is about a mile west on a slope near Possum Creek. In fact, so close that erosion is cutting the bank quite close to the wrought iron enclosure that contains on stone standing and one lying face down. The stone is new, erected in 1967 to the memory of RACHEL STARRY, w/o Solomon LONG and mother of Geo. Randall Long 1812-1833 by her great-granddaughters Sadie Long Cocke of Texas and Mary Long Bolding of Oklahoma. The cemetery is located next to a cabin, which can be seen from the driveway. The cemetery was much larger at one time. Tradition is that this was also an Indian burial ground, marked, at one time, by large round stones. These are gone now, as is evidence of later white burials. It was evidently used by several of the early pioneers, but little record now remains. It was probably used by many families in the early days. The 1966 History of Warren County, page 115, gives the following information about this cemetery: "Among those known to be buried there are some of the Sisson family, Daniel Fosher, Silas Garrison and family, Gabriel Shoaff, John Musgrave and family, a daughter of Daniel Starry, Henry Thaney, some of Solomon Long's family, some of the Stingleys, the Rooneys, the Spiggards, perhaps Jacob Baugh, and many others. Tradition is that a Revolutionary soldier is buried here. All that remains today is one Rooney tombstone, some fragments, and an iron fence marking the Spiggard lot." THE SISSON GRAVEYARD Compiled by Nancy Sumner Miller R. 2, West Lebanon, Indiana Sent to Indianapolis Library April 22, 1983 by Mrs. Elmer Smith of Williamsport When Jessie Tomlinson of Chillicothie, Ohio, came to Indiana to settle in 1827 he purchased of William Sisson 80 acres of land in Steuben Twonship, Warren County, Indiana. On this tract of land was a small Indian Village and a burying ground in which a great many Indians were buried, also a great many of the early settlers including the following people: Daniel Fasher, Several of the Sissons, Silas Garrison and family, Gabriel Shoaf, John Musgrove and family, Daughter of Daniel Starry, A child of Mr. Thaney, Some of Solomon Long's family, A member of Stingle's family, Perhaps Jacob Brugh, Later Mr. and Mrs. George Spiggard and one child. Mr. and Mrs. Spiggard were prominent settlers in the early development of the country and their names appear iin some of the early abstracts. Mr. and Mrs. Spiggard are also the great-great grandparents of Congressman Jessie Sumner of the 18th District of Illinois whose home is in Milford, Illinois. The only Indian graves whose markings can be seen now are five; fifteen years ago nineteen (19) could be counted. The graves of Mr. and Mrs. Spiggard and child are yet marked and enclosed with an iron fence around the lot. The marble slab which marked the grave of Gabriel Shoaf was taken for a door step at the summer bungalow that was built about 20 years ago by Dr. Edens of Danville, Illinois, who then owned the farm in the midst of this sacred burying ground. The above graves spoken of are all that are left that are visible to the observer of this once big burying ground of our early pioneers and the Indians. Tradition has it that some Civil War Soldiers and one Revolutionary War Soldier were buried here. The following information is from James W. McClaflin, Hoopston, IL January, 1985 It is unfortunate that many old cemeteries were abandoned and have disappeared from the scene. An example is the old Sisson Cemetery on a farm about one and one-half miles southwest of Marshfield in Stueben Township. The only remaining evidence is an iron fence marking the grave site of my wife's great great grandparents, John Smith Spickard, Sr. (1789-1840) and Mary Magdalena (Deeds) Spickard (1800-1837), plus their infant Magdalena (1837-1837). We were told the fence was ordered built there many years ago by a granddaughter of the Spickards, Martha Jane "Jennie" (Taylor) Sumner and her husband Jesse Sumner of Milford, Ill. A few fragments of stones from abandoned graves surrounding the Spickard plot have been put inside the fence. At least that is the way it was five or six years ago. The cemetery site, being about one-third of a mile west off the north-south road, is a couple hundred yards (more or less) west of the farmhouse across a bridge over Possum Run Creek and beyond the bluff above and at a bend in the creek putting its course on the north side of the subject site at that particular point. In my collection of material I notice on a couple of maps from another researcher where he has incorrectly shown the Sisson Cemetery on the east side of the creek. The Tomlinson Cemetery is east of the creek and a few yards northeast of the farmhouse. The side of the high bluff nest to the Sisson Cemetery has eroded away a number of feet over the years. At one time it was possible to drive a team of horses and wagon between the edge of the bluff and the iron fence on the Spickard plot, and five years ago there was barely enough space for a person to walk. We understood that with the erosion some of the graves near the bluff had collapsed in past years to the lower level by the creek. Some years ago the owner of the land (believe the name was George Edens) and living in Danville, Ill., at the time built a summer cabin on the site over some abandoned graves. It was said some markers could be seen under the cabin floor. My wife, Mary Ellen (Taylor) who died in June 1981, was a granddaughter of George Y. Taylor who was a brother of Martha Jane "Jennie" (Taylor) Sumner mentioned in a previous paragraph. George an Martha were two of the five children of Aaron Young Taylor and Mary Ann (Spickard) Taylor of State Line in Kent Twp., Ind. Mary Ann was one of the nine children of John Smith Spickard, Sr., and Mary Magdalena (Deeds) Spickard. It should be stated that in some old written or printed articles the name was incorrectly spelled "Spiggard."

Date: 7/23/1985
Origin: Warren County, Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions Volume II
Author: Rosella Rasmussen Jenkins
Record ID: 00002896
Type: Cemetery Record
Source Archive: Jenkins-Knowles
Date Entered: 10/28/2010
Collection: Williamsport-Washington Township Public Library
Entered By: WCHS

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