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Title: Communicated.-Pine Village
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The following communication we received too late for insertion, in our issue of April 28th. We give it room this week: PINE VILLAGE, INDIANA, Monday April 25, 1870. MR. EDITOR: Knowing that this pleasant little village has the name of being very quiet and moral, and knowing that the reputation does not rightly belong to it, I feel it my duty, since others keep silent, to give some account of the occupation of a large majority of the young people of the village and vicinity. On other days nothing worse than profanity presents itself to my notice. Unless I might mention gambling by "Brush Lodge, No. 2," in the Fair Ground. But the "order of sancity" which should prevail among christian people on Sunday, is here dispelled by crowds of boys and men, who collect for the purpose of playing "base ball", croquet, leap frog, and not a few to play at cards. While others play checkers and stand idly by to "take items." One thing I have noticed, that made me think the young men and boys of our place, who take part in the above mentioned Sabbath breaking acts, are not wholly responsible for their own actions, is the presence, nearly always, of the old men, some of them members of the church, at such scenes as "lookers on." Of course their presence gives encouragement to those who participate in the plays. I have heard a great deal of talk about Rainsville and Independence being "hard" places. If they abolish liquor and enjoin temperance on these places, I defy them to compete with Pine Village for the approbation of the devil. Only yesterday, two young men-whose names I withhold-went south of town, on Main Street, and came into town on a race, come near causing a team to run away with a lady, whose husband had left her to make a purchase in a store, and made a great deal of noise and excitement generally. One of the young men is the son of a local Preacher, and I think a good man. I am sorry he has no better influence on his son, if he had I know he would use it well. I hope in future young men will respect themselves more than to act as hitherto, and that old men and church members will cease to give their approbation by looking on. I hope no one will consider me presumeing for writing this, for "forbearance has ceased to be a virtue." Let's have a revolution of the Sunday system here. Truly, &c., OBSERVER.

Date: 5/5/1870
Origin: Warren Republican
Author:
Record ID: 00003056
Type: Periodical
Source Archive: Warren County Historical Society
Date Entered: 3/20/2011
Collection: Newspaper Clipping Scrapbook
Entered By: WCHS

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